Monday, November 18, 2013

Best crowdsourcing for the Typhoon

After a morning of searching, I see the the google crisis map as a good solution; there are many other crowdsourced maps that have popped up in the last week. Relief workers should have staff monitoring these for relevant entries to their area of concern.

The google crisis map allows you to upload data or datasets by using a questionnaire available here. This is organized in Google's Crisis Response group. There is also a Typhoon Yolanda people finder that is very useful.

The Philippines government crowdsourcing data and GIS data
http://disaster.dswd.gov.ph/maps.php

The Philippines government crowdsourced GIS data server
http://disaster.dswd.gov.ph/maps.php

The Google site obtains much of its data from ESRI here:
http://fema-services2.esri.com/arcgis/rest/services/2013_Cyclone_Haiyan/Cyclone_Haiyan_Impact/MapServer/

The ESRI hosted crowdsourcing map
http://giscorps.maps.arcgis.com/apps/OnePane/basicviewer/index.html?appid=cf6031322a334cc3bfe3f9a74f23b384

The openstreet map crowdsourced data map and map resources
http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=11/11.2353/124.9994&layers=H

The Philippines government website with many useful PDFs and updated factsheets
http://www.gov.ph/crisis-response/updates-typhoon-yolanda/

Reliefweb
http://reliefweb.int/map/philippines/philippines-typhoon-haiyan-yolanda-infrastructure-north-iloilo-and-capiz-15-nov-2013

Also see the UN OCHA: Office for coordination of humanitarian affairs:
http://www.unocha.org/crisis/typhoonhaiyan

See the Stand by task force:
http://blog.standbytaskforce.com/

The University of Heidelberg
http://crisismap.geog.uni-heidelberg.de/http://crisismap.geog.uni-heidelberg.de/

In choosing which site to check first, I  look for the following:


  • How simple it is to upload something
  • How the website validates that the problem actually exists
  • How the website is updated when the crisis resolves
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